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Community Profile: Glasgow-Barren County, Kentucky



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By Sadie Fowler

When you look around Glasgow, Kentucky you’ll find warmth. At first glance, its small-town Southern charm feels welcoming to visitors and locals — they’ll take notice of friendly people and an atmosphere that depicts a strong sense of community.

But if you look a little deeper beneath the surface, Glasgow, the county seat of Barren County, is a showcase of a vibrant community with a dedication to its residents, art, industry and education.

The population in Glasgow is about 14,500 and in Barren County, about 45,000.
“By and large, Glasgow has progressed well because of the cooperation that exists between government and economic development,” said Ernie Myers, executive vice president of the Chamber.

Glasgow is home to several major industries, a regional hospital, an extension campus of Western Kentucky University, a 1,000-seat plus performing arts center, dozens of historic venues and much more.

Known and named for its Scottish roots, there’s a lot to do in Glasgow as well, including events all year long. Perhaps most popular is the Highland Games, which takes place in May and roots back to 1986.

“It’s the first weekend after Memorial Day and it’s a celebration and gathering of Scottish clans,” Myers said. “It’s an international event. We have people from not just the United States but also a number of people from Ireland, Scotland and England.

A major draw to Glasgow and Barren County is that it offers what its citizens need.

Agriculture is the number one industry in Barren County, and it leads the state in gross annual product in beef, dairy, soy beans, and alfalfa, producing more of these products than any other county in Kentucky.

Healthcare is a strong part of the community. TJ Samson Hospital, which is considered regional and serves most of the population east of Barren County, and Barren County itself. The hospital is known for its quality care and services that include major surgeries like open heart surgery and even transplants.

In terms of industry, the county employs nearly 7,000 in manufacturing jobs. Commercial business also remains strong, with a number of businesses and centers, including Walmart, located on the 31E Bypass, which draws commercial business out to easier accessible areas.
Barren County is widely known in the Bluegrass state for being a “caves to lakes” community. Community leaders have the luxury of relying on the Barren River and its parks system is also very healthy. There are six parks within the city limits and the county has grown to include several parks as well.

It’s emphasis on culture, arts and history — another highlight of the within Fort Williams and other fine museums — it’s no wonder Glasgow and Barren County also have a reputation for being a great place to receive and education and raise a family.

Coming up in August, another very popular event serves as sort of a combination of everything in terms of industry, education and opportunity. The South Central Kentucky Business Expo, hosted by the Chamber, draws many vendors who do business in the area who want to be exposed to the workforce as well as future generations.

The following month, in September, there’s Industry Appreciation Week. More than 500 students from all over the area come to this event to learn more about what industry-related jobs are available.

“It’s standing room only, to be honest,” said Myers. “Capping off the week, we do a big golf outing where people come together for a good old time.”

Also, coming up in the months ahead, the 39th annual Arts, Crafts and Gifts Fair is held in September with the annual car show taking place downtown in October. The Chamber’s website is full of activities on its calendar for anyone wanting to find something to do at any given month of the year.

Myers is quick to point out that, like many southern towns, the square is more of a place for businesses/offices spaces than being a hub of social activities, shopping and restaurants. This resulted in the building of the Bypass back in the 1960s.

“What’s the moral of the story?” joked Myers. “In 2018 people are still (complaining) and moaning about traffic on the square. Our downtown is more offices and we are not unique. Every southern community has experienced this where the hub of activity, which was once on the square, moved to outlying areas.”

Myers described the area as being extremely welcoming to newcomers, who move there because of its cost of living and weather.

“We have a lot of Yankees that come here because of the climate,” said Ann Stewart who oversees the Chambers marketing and communications. “They find out it’s not always warm, but is always welcoming … They are interested for a variety of reasons ranging from location to jobs. We have a good industrial base and a very strong school system.

“People want to be involved here, in things like theater, the arts and things like that. Artistically, Glasgow is quite healthy … Actually, we are a healthy county and I don’t mean that physically.”

When you look around Glasgow, Kentucky you’ll find warmth. At first glance, its small-town Southern charm feels welcoming to visitors and locals — they’ll take notice of friendly people and an atmosphere that depicts a strong sense of community.
But if you look a little deeper beneath the surface, Glasgow, the county seat of Barren County, is a showcase of a vibrant community with a dedication to its residents, art, industry and education.

The population in Glasgow is about 14,500 and in Barren County, about 45,000.
“By and large, Glasgow has progressed well because of the cooperation that exists between government and economic development,” said Ernie Myers, executive vice president of the Chamber.

Glasgow is home to several major industries, a regional hospital, an extension campus of Western Kentucky University, a 1,000-seat plus performing arts center, dozens of historic venues and much more.

Known and named for its Scottish roots, there’s a lot to do in Glasgow as well, including events all year long. Perhaps most popular is the Highland Games, which takes place in May and roots back to 1986.

“It’s the first weekend after Memorial Day and it’s a celebration and gathering of Scottish clans,” Myers said. “It’s an international event. We have people from not just the United States but also a number of people from Ireland, Scotland and England.

A major draw to Glasgow and Barren County is that it offers what its citizens need.
Agriculture is the number one industry in Barren County, and it leads the state in gross annual product in beef, dairy, soy beans, and alfalfa, producing more of these products than any other county in Kentucky.

Healthcare is a strong part of the community. TJ Samson Hospital, which is considered regional and serves most of the population east of Barren County, and Barren County itself. The hospital is known for its quality care and services that include major surgeries like open heart surgery and even transplants.

In terms of industry, the county employs nearly 7,000 in manufacturing jobs. Commercial business also remains strong, with a number of businesses and centers, including Walmart, located on the 31E Bypass, which draws commercial business out to easier accessible areas.
Barren County is widely known in the Bluegrass state for being a “caves to lakes” community. Community leaders have the luxury of relying on the Barren River and its parks system is also very healthy. There are six parks within the city limits and the county has grown to include several parks as well.

It’s emphasis on culture, arts and history — another highlight of the within Fort Williams and other fine museums — it’s no wonder Glasgow and Barren County also have a reputation for being a great place to receive and education and raise a family.

Coming up in August, another very popular event serves as sort of a combination of everything in terms of industry, education and opportunity. The South Central Kentucky Business Expo, hosted by the Chamber, draws many vendors who do business in the area who want to be exposed to the workforce as well as future generations.

The following month, in September, there’s Industry Appreciation Week. More than 500 students from all over the area come to this event to learn more about what industry-related jobs are available.

“It’s standing room only, to be honest,” said Myers. “Capping off the week, we do a big golf outing where people come together for a good old time.”

Also, coming up in the months ahead, the 39th annual Arts, Crafts and Gifts Fair is held in September with the annual car show taking place downtown in October. The Chamber’s website is full of activities on its calendar for anyone wanting to find something to do at any given month of the year.

Myers is quick to point out that, like many southern towns, the square is more of a place for businesses/offices spaces than being a hub of social activities, shopping and restaurants. This resulted in the building of the Bypass back in the 1960s.

“What’s the moral of the story?” joked Myers. “In 2018 people are still (complaining) and moaning about traffic on the square. Our downtown is more offices and we are not unique. Every southern community has experienced this where the hub of activity, which was once on the square, moved to outlying areas.”

Myers described the area as being extremely welcoming to newcomers, who move there because of its cost of living and weather.

“We have a lot of Yankees that come here because of the climate,” said Ann Stewart who oversees the Chambers marketing and communications. “They find out it’s not always warm, but is always welcoming … They are interested for a variety of reasons ranging from location to jobs. We have a good industrial base and a very strong school system.

“People want to be involved here, in things like theater, the arts and things like that. Artistically, Glasgow is quite healthy … Actually, we are a healthy county and I don’t mean that physically.”


Eat up!

There’s plenty of good grub with all the fixins’ in Glasgow and Barren County. Most recently, a lot of buzz surrounds news of a new gastro pub to open in the months to come. Also, locals highly recommend a Glasgow favorite called “A Little Taste of Texas.”
    
68 & 80 Market and Deli
A Little Taste of Texas
Anna’s Greek Restaurant
Applebee’s
Azul Tequila
Best Donuts
Big Man’s BBQ
Big Moose’s BBQ Smokehouse
Cancun Mexican Grill
China King Buffet
Colton’s
Dairy Queen
El Mazatlan
Evergreen Chinese
Family Style Chicken and Seafood
Fine Arts Bistro & Imagineer Workshop
Garcia’s Grill
Gale ‘n’ Dale’s
George J Ellis Mercantile
Gondolier
Kanha Kafe
Los Mariachis Mexican
Marcos Pizza
MJK Feed Meal Restaurant
Paradise Point
Rib Licker’s Smoke Shack
Shogun
Sidelines Casual Dining
The Ole French Restaurant
Yamato Japanese Steakhouse


Go & Do!

 


Where to shop

Big Lots
Burkes Outlet
Factory Connection
From My Closet to Yours
Just for Kids Consignment
Little Black Dress
Mary Anne’s Hallmark
Michelle’s Consignment Boutique
Regiss Bridal & Prom
Sassy’s Treasure Chest
Sears Hometown Store
Shabby Chic Antiques
Shoe Sensation
Stage
Trendy Me
Unique Gifts, Inc.


Where to Stay

1818 Main Street Bed and Breakfast
Barren River Lake State Resort Park
Carroll Properties
Comfort Inn
Days Inn
Four Seasons Country Inn
Hall Place Bed and Breakfast
Holiday Inn Express
The Narrow Way Bed and Breakfast
Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Camp-Resort

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